staid

[ steyd ]
/ steɪd /

adjective

of settled or sedate character; not flighty or capricious.
fixed, settled, or permanent.

verb

Archaic. a simple past tense and past participle of stay1.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum

Origin of staid

1535–45 for adj. use

SYNONYMS FOR staid

1 proper, serious, decorous, solemn. Staid, sedate, settled indicate a sober and composed type of conduct. Staid indicates an ingrained seriousness and propriety that shows itself in complete decorum; a colorless kind of correctness is indicated: a staid and uninteresting family. Sedate applies to one who is noticeably quiet, composed, and sober in conduct: a sedate and dignified young man. One who is settled has become fixed, especially in a sober or determined way, in manner, judgments, or mode of life: He is young to be so settled in his ways.

OTHER WORDS FROM staid

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for staidly

British Dictionary definitions for staidly

staid
/ (steɪd) /

adjective

of a settled, sedate, and steady character
rare permanent

Derived forms of staid

staidly, adverbstaidness, noun

Word Origin for staid

C16: obsolete past participle of stay 1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012