Dictionary.com

stickout

[ stik-out ]
/ ˈstɪkˌaʊt /
Informal.
Save This Word!

noun

a person who is outstanding or conspicuous, usually for superior endowments, talents, etc.: Jimmy Brown is the stickout among running backs.

adjective

outstanding; conspicuous: a stickout actor.

QUIZZES

QUIZ YOURSELF ON “ITS” VS. “IT’S”!

Apostrophes can be tricky; prove you know the difference between it’s and its in this crafty quiz!
Question 1 of 12
On the farm, the feed for chicks is significantly different from the roosters’; ______ not even comparable.

Origin of stickout

First recorded in 1840–50; noun, adj. use of verb phrase stick out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for stickout

stick out

verb (adverb)

to project or cause to project
(tr) informal to endure (something disagreeable) (esp in the phrase stick it out)
stick out a mile or stick out like a sore thumb informal to be extremely obvious
stick out for (intr) to insist on (a demand), refusing to yield until it is metthe unions stuck out for a ten per cent wage rise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with stickout

stick out

1

Also, stick out a mile or like a sore thumb. Be very prominent or conspicuous, as in Dad's funny hat made him stick out in the crowd, or That purple house sticks out a mile, or John's lie sticks out like a sore thumb. The first term dates from the mid-1500s, the variants from the first half of the 1900s. The variant using thumb alludes to the propensity for holding an injured thumb stiffly, making it stand out (and thereby risking further injury).

2

Continue doing something, endure something, as in I know you don't like it but you have to stick out the job for another month. [Late 1600s] A variant is stick it out, as in His new play's boring, but since he's my cousin we'd better stick it out. [Late 1800s] Also see stick it, def. 1.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
Get Online Help For Kids!