subordination

[ suh-bawr-dn-ey-shuh n ]
/ səˌbɔr dnˈeɪ ʃən /

noun

the act of placing in a lower rank or position: The refusal to allow women to be educated was part of society's subordination of women to men.
the act subordinating, or of making dependent, secondary, or subservient.
the condition of being subordinated, or made dependent, secondary, or subservient.

QUIZZES

DO YOU KNOW THIS VOCABULARY FROM "THE HANDMAID'S TALE"?

"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
Question 1 of 10
decorum
Sometimes sub·or·di·na·cy [suh-bawr-dn-uh-see] /səˈbɔr dn ə si/.

OTHER WORDS FROM subordination

non·sub·or·di·na·tion, nounpre·sub·or·di·na·tion, nounself-sub·or·di·na·tion, noun

Definition for subordinacy (2 of 2)

subordinate
[ adjective, noun suh-bawr-dn-it; verb suh-bawr-dn-eyt ]
/ adjective, noun səˈbɔr dn ɪt; verb səˈbɔr dnˌeɪt /

adjective

noun

a subordinate person or thing.

verb (used with object), sub·or·di·nat·ed, sub·or·di·nat·ing.

Origin of subordinate

1425–75; late Middle English (adj.) < Medieval Latin subōrdinātus past participle of subōrdināre to subordinate, equivalent to Latin sub- sub- + ōrdin- (stem of ōrdō) rank, order + -ātus -ate1

SYNONYMS FOR subordinate

ANTONYMS FOR subordinate

OTHER WORDS FROM subordinate

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for subordinacy

subordinate

adjective (səˈbɔːdɪnɪt)

of lesser order or importance
under the authority or control of anothera subordinate functionary

noun (səˈbɔːdɪnɪt)

a person or thing that is subordinate

verb (səˈbɔːdɪˌneɪt) (tr usually foll by to)

to put in a lower rank or position (than)
to make subservientto subordinate mind to heart

Derived forms of subordinate

subordinately, adverbsubordination or subordinateness, nounsubordinative, adjective

Word Origin for subordinate

C15: from Medieval Latin subordināre, from Latin sub- + ordō rank
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for subordinacy

subordination

The use of expressions that make one element of a sentence dependent on another. In the following sentence, the first (italicized) clause (also called a subordinate clause) is subordinate to the second clause: “Despite all efforts toward a peaceful settlement of the dispute, war finally broke out.” (Compare coordination, dependent clause, and independent clause.)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.