cycle

[sahy-kuh l]
|

noun

verb (used without object), cy·cled, cy·cling.

to ride or travel by bicycle, motorcycle, tricycle, etc.
to move or revolve in cycles; pass through cycles.

Idioms

    hit for the cycle, Baseball. (of one player) to hit a single, double, triple, and home run in one game.

Origin of cycle

1350–1400; Middle English cicle < Late Latin cyclus < Greek kýklos cycle, circle, wheel, ring, disk, orb; see wheel
Related formssu·per·cy·cle, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for supercycle

cycle

noun

a recurring period of time in which certain events or phenomena occur and reach completion or repeat themselves in a regular sequence
a completed series of events that follows or is followed by another series of similar events occurring in the same sequence
the time taken or needed for one such series
a vast period of time; age; aeon
a group of poems or prose narratives forming a continuous story about a central figure or eventthe Arthurian cycle
a series of miracle playsthe Chester cycle
a group or sequence of songsSee song cycle
astronomy the orbit of a celestial body
a recurrent series of events or processes in plants and animalsa life cycle; a growth cycle; a metabolic cycle
physics a continuous change or a sequence of changes in the state of a system that leads to the restoration of the system to its original state after a finite period of time
one of a series of repeated changes in the magnitude of a periodically varying quantity, such as current or voltage
computing
  1. a set of operations that can be both treated and repeated as a unit
  2. the time required to complete a set of operations
  3. one oscillation of the regular voltage waveform used to synchronize processes in a digital computer
(in generative grammar) the set of cyclic rules

verb

(tr) to process through a cycle or system
(intr) to move in or pass through cycles
to travel by or ride a bicycle or tricycle
Derived Formscycling, noun, adjective

Word Origin for cycle

C14: from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kuklos cycle, circle, ring, wheel; see wheel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for supercycle

cycle

v.

1842, "revolve in cycles," from cycle (n.). Meaning "to ride a bicycle" is from 1883. Related: Cycled; cycling.

cycle

n.

late 14c., from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kyklos "circle, wheel, any circular body, circular motion, cycle of events," from PIE *kwel- "to roll, to move around, wheel" (cf. Sanskrit cakram "circle, wheel," carati "he moves, wanders;" Avestan caraiti "applies himself," c'axra "chariot, wagon;" Greek polos "a round axis" (PIE *kw- becomes Greek p- before some vowels), polein "move around;" Latin colere "to frequent, dwell in, to cultivate, move around," cultus "tended, cultivated," hence also "polished," colonus "husbandman, tenant farmer, settler, colonist;" Lithuanian kelias "a road, a way;" Old Norse hvel, Old English hweol "wheel;" Old Russian kolo, Polish koło, Russian koleso "a wheel").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

supercycle in Medicine

cycle

[sīkəl]

n.

An interval of time during which a characteristic, often regularly repeated event or sequence of events occurs.
A single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon.
A periodically repeated sequence of events.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

supercycle in Science

cycle

[sīkəl]

A single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon. See also period.
A circular or whorled arrangement of flower parts such as those of petals or stamens.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.