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syenite

[ sahy-uh-nahyt ]
/ ˈsaɪ əˌnaɪt /
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noun

a granular igneous rock consisting chiefly of orthoclase and oligoclase with hornblende, biotite, or augite.

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Origin of syenite

First recorded in 1790–1800; from Latin syēnītēs (lapis) “(stone) of Syene” (the ancient name of Aswan, an Egyptian city on the Nile), from Greek syēnī́tēs (líthos); see -ite1

OTHER WORDS FROM syenite

sy·e·nit·ic [sahy-uh-nit-ik], /ˌsaɪ əˈnɪt ɪk/, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

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British Dictionary definitions for syenite

syenite
/ (ˈsaɪəˌnaɪt) /

noun

a light-coloured coarse-grained plutonic igneous rock consisting of feldspars with hornblende or biotite

Derived forms of syenite

syenitic (ˌsaɪəˈnɪtɪk), adjective

Word Origin for syenite

C18: from French syénite, from Latin syēnītēs lapis stone from Syene (Aswan), where it was originally quarried
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for syenite

syenite
[ sīə-nīt′ ]

A light-colored, coarse-grained igneous rock consisting primarily of alkali feldspar together with some mafic minerals, especially hornblende. Unlike most igneous rocks, syenite has little or no quartz. It is believed to form from the cooling of magma that forms at very high temperatures and at great depths. It is the coarse-grained equivalent of trachyte.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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