take-in

[ teyk-in ]
/ ˈteɪkˌɪn /

noun Informal.

a deception, fraud, or imposition.

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Origin of take-in

First recorded in 1770–80; noun use of verb phrase take in
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for take-in

take in

verb (tr, adverb)

noun take-in

informal the act or an instance of cheating or deceiving
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with take-in

take in

1

Admit, receive as a guest or employee, as in They offered to take in two of the orphaned children. [First half of 1500s]

2

Reduce in size, make smaller or shorter, as in I've lost some weight so I'll have to take in my clothes. [Early 1500s]

3

Include or constitute, as in This list takes in all the members, past and present. [Mid-1600s]

4

Understand, as in I couldn't take in all that French dialogue in the movie. [Second half of 1600s]

5

Deceive, swindle, as in That alleged fundraiser took me in completely. [First half of 1700s]

6

Look at thoroughly, as in We want to take in all the sights. [First half of 1700s]

7

Accept work to be done at home, as in His grandmother took in washing to support her children. [First half of 1800s]

8

Receive as proceeds, as in We had a good audience; how much did we take in? [Late 1800s] Also see the following entries beginning with take in.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.