takeout

or take-out

[ teyk-out ]
/ ˈteɪkˌaʊt /

noun

adjective

pertaining to or supplying food and drink to be taken out and consumed elsewhere: the takeout window of a restaurant.
Also takedown. of, relating to, or providing a takeout mortgage: The high-rise developer has found a takeout commitment from a large insurance company.

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Origin of takeout

First recorded in 1915–20; noun use of verb phrase take out
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for takeout

British Dictionary definitions for takeout

take out

verb (tr, adverb)

adjective takeout

noun takeout US and Canadian

a shop or restaurant that sells such foodlet's go to the Chinese takeout
a meal bought at such a shop or restaurantwe'll have a takeout tonight to save cooking
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with takeout

take out

1

Extract, remove, as in He should take out that splinter: [c. 1300]

2

Secure by applying to an authority, as in She took out a real estate license. [Late 1600s]

3

Escort on a date, as in He's been taking out a different girl every night of the week. [c. 1600]

4

Give vent to; see take it out on.

5

Carry away for use elsewhere, as in Can we get some pizza to take out?

6

Obtain as an equivalent in different form, as in We took out the money she owed us by having her baby-sit. [Early 1600s]

7

Set out, as in Jan and Herb took out for the beach, or The police took out after the suspects. [Mid-1800s]

8

Kill, destroy, as in Two snipers took out a whole platoon, or Flying low, the plane took out the enemy bunker in one pass. [1930s]

9

See under take out of.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.