therm

or therme

[thurm]

Origin of therm

First recorded in 1885–90, therm is from the Greek word thérmē heat

therm.

therm-

  1. variant of thermo- before a vowel: thermesthesia.

-therm

  1. variant of thermo- as final element in compound words: isotherm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for therm

Historical Examples of therm

  • It has long been known that these houses were built on the old walls and vaults of the Therm.

    Rambles in Rome

    S. Russell Forbes

  • These are supposed to have stood near the grand entrance of the Therm.

    Old Rome

    Robert Burn

  • A similar arrangement is found in the Therm of Titus and Diocletian.

    Old Rome

    Robert Burn

  • The two large halls which belonged to the Therm are to the east of the reservoirs.

    Old Rome

    Robert Burn

  • The other hall of the Therm stands not far off, and is circular with a domed roof.

    Old Rome

    Robert Burn


British Dictionary definitions for therm

therm

noun
  1. British a unit of heat equal to 100 000 British thermal units. One therm is equal to 1.055 056 × 10 8 joules

Word Origin for therm

C19: from Greek thermē heat
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

therm in Medicine

therm-

pref.
  1. Variant ofthermo-

-therm

suff.
  1. An organism having a specified kind of body temperature:exotherm.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.