tomograph

[ toh-muh-graf, -grahf ]
/ ˈtoʊ məˌgræf, -ˌgrɑf /

noun

a machine for making an x-ray of a selected plane of the body.

Origin of tomograph

Related forms

to·mo·graph·ic [toh-muh-graf-ik] /ˌtoʊ məˈgræf ɪk/, adjectiveto·mo·graph·i·cal·ly, adverbto·mog·ra·phy [tuh-mog-ruh-fee] /təˈmɒg rə fi/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for tomography

tomography

/ (təˈmɒɡrəfɪ) /

noun

any of a number of techniques used to obtain an X-ray photograph of a selected plane section of the human body or some other solid object

Word Origin for tomography

C20: from Greek tomē a cutting + -graphy
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for tomography (1 of 2)

tomography

[ tō-mŏgrə-fē ]

n.

Any of several techniques for making detailed x-rays of a plane section of a solid object, such as the body, while blurring out the images of other planes.laminagraphy planigraphy planography stratigraphy

Related forms

to′mo•graphic (tō′mə-grăfĭk) adj.

Medicine definitions for tomography (2 of 2)

tomograph

[ tōmə-grăf′ ]

n.

The radiographic equipment used in tomography.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for tomography

tomography

[ tō-mŏgrə-fē ]

Any of several radiologic techniques for making detailed three-dimensional images of a plane section of a solid object, such as the body, while blurring out the images of other planes. See also computerized axial tomography positron emission tomography.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Culture definitions for tomography

tomography

[ (tuh-mog-ruh-fee) ]

A procedure by which waves are sent through an object and computers produce images of cross sections of the object by using information on how the waves are changed. Both ultrasound and CAT scans are medical uses of this technique, but it is also widely used in science and industry.


The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.