ultrasound

[uhl-truh-sound]
noun
  1. Physics. sound with a frequency greater than 20,000 Hz, approximately the upper limit of human hearing.
  2. Medicine/Medical. the application of ultrasonic waves to therapy or diagnostics, as in deep-heat treatment of a joint or imaging of internal structures.

Origin of ultrasound

First recorded in 1920–25; ultra- + sound1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

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British Dictionary definitions for ultrasound

ultrasound

noun
  1. ultrasonic waves at frequencies above the audible range (above about 20 kHz), used in cleaning metallic parts, echo sounding, medical diagnosis and therapy, etc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ultrasound

1923, from ultra- + sound. Cf. ultrasonic. In reference to ultrasonic techniques of detection or diagnosis it is recorded from 1958.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

ultrasound in Medicine

ultrasound

[ŭltrə-sound′]
n.
  1. Ultrasonic sound.
  2. The use of ultrasonic waves for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, specifically to visualize an internal body structure, monitor a developing fetus, or generate localized deep heat to the tissues.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

ultrasound in Science

ultrasound

[ŭltrə-sound′]
  1. Sound whose frequency is above the upper limit of the range of human hearing (approximately 20 kilohertz).
  2. See ultrasonography.
  3. An image produced by ultrasonography.
Related formsultrasonic adjective (ŭl′trə-sŏnĭk)
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ultrasound in Culture

ultrasound

A method of diagnosing illness and viewing internal body structures in which sound waves of high frequency are bounced off internal organs and tissues from outside the body. The technique measures different amounts of resistance the body parts offer to the sound waves, and then uses the data to produce a “picture” of the structures. Ultrasound is often used to obtain an image of the developing fetus in pregnant women; the image can confirm the presence of twins or triplets and can be used to diagnose some abnormalities.

Note

When an image of the inside of the body is needed, ultrasound is often considered a safer alternative to x-rays. Like x-rays, ultrasound involves exposure of the body to a form of radiation; unlike x-rays, ultrasound has not been shown to be carcinogenic.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.