tra-la

or tra-la-la

[trah-lah or trah-lah-lah]

Origin of tra-la

First recorded in 1815–25
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for tra-la

Historical Examples of tra-la

  • "Tra-la, comrade," he shouted, leaping out of the cellar as soon as he saw me.

  • "Tra-la, tra-la-la-la-la," chirped he, softly and contentedly.

    The Diamond Coterie

    Lawrence L. Lynch

  • Then Kipps began to sing, "Ar pars eight tra-la, in the lane be'ind the church."

    Kipps

    H. G. Wells

  • The "tra-la" was considered to render this sentence incomprehensible to the uninitiated.

    Kipps

    H. G. Wells

  • He took the doll and jumped it up and down in the air, dancing about and singing, “Tra-la.”


British Dictionary definitions for tra-la

tra-la

tra-la-la (ˌtrɑːlɑːˈlɑː)

noun
  1. a set of nonsensical syllables used in humming music, esp for a melody or refrain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012