treenail

or tre·nail, trun·nel

[tree-neyl, tren-l, truhn-l]

Origin of treenail

First recorded in 1250–1300, treenail is from the Middle English word trenayl. See tree, nail
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for treenail

Historical Examples of treenail

  • "The ship has sent up these rockets to warn us of our danger," said Mr Treenail.

    Tom Cringle's Log

    Michael Scott

  • "Thank God, they have retreated after all," said Mr Treenail.

    Tom Cringle's Log

    Michael Scott

  • Treenail was coolness itself, and I aped him as well as I could.

    Tom Cringle's Log

    Michael Scott

  • True enough, Treenail; so the sooner we make a dash through the opening the better.

    Tom Cringle's Log

    Michael Scott

  • "My lads, we are now sure of your game," sung out Treenail, with great animation.

    Tom Cringle's Log

    Michael Scott


British Dictionary definitions for treenail

treenail

trenail trunnel (ˈtrʌnəl)

noun
  1. a dowel used for pinning planks or timbers together
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012