Idioms

    do/turn the trick, to achieve the desired effect or result: Another turn of the pliers should do the trick.
    turn a trick, Slang. (of a prostitute) to engage in a sexual act with a customer.

Origin of trick

1375–1425; late Middle English trik (noun) < Old North French trique deceit, derivative of trikier to deceive < Vulgar Latin *triccāre, for Latin trīcārī to play tricks
Related formstrick·er, nountrick·ing·ly, adverbout·trick, verb (used with object)un·tricked, adjective

Synonyms for trick

Synonym study

1. Trick , artifice , ruse , stratagem , wile are terms for crafty or cunning devices that are intended to deceive. Trick , the general term, refers usually to an underhanded act designed to cheat someone, but it sometimes refers merely to a pleasurable deceiving of the senses: to win by a trick. Like trick , but to a greater degree, artifice emphasizes the cleverness, ingenuity, or cunning with which the proceeding is devised: an artifice of diabolical ingenuity. Ruse and stratagem emphasize the purpose for which the trick is designed; ruse is the more general term of the two, and stratagem sometimes implies a more elaborate procedure or a military application: He gained entrance by a ruse. His stratagem gave them command of the hill. W ile emphasizes the disarming effect of the trick upon those who are deceived: His wiles charmed them into trusting him. 18. See cheat.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for tricked

Contemporary Examples of tricked

Historical Examples of tricked

  • Its visor grinned at him--the fool, the tricked, the supplanted.

    Viviette

    William J. Locke

  • As before, so now they tricked the eye into a fancy that they lived.

  • It is undoubtedly better to deceive him entirely, and since he will be stubborn he must be tricked.

    Lady Susan

    Jane Austen

  • He first starved, and then tricked me; and if I could I'd kill him.'

  • But you took it not—You were driven on one side, and, possibly, tricked on the other.

    Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9)

    Samuel Richardson


British Dictionary definitions for tricked

trick

noun

a deceitful, cunning, or underhand action or plan
  1. a mischievous, malicious, or humorous action or plan; jokethe boys are up to their tricks again
  2. (as modifier)a trick spider
an illusory or magical feat or device
a simple feat learned by an animal or person
an adroit or ingenious device; knacka trick of the trade
a behavioural trait, habit, or mannerism
a turn or round of duty or work
cards
  1. a batch of cards containing one from each player, usually played in turn and won by the player or side that plays the card with the highest value
  2. a card that can potentially win a trick
can't take a trick Australian slang to be consistently unsuccessful or unlucky
do the trick informal to produce the right or desired result
how's tricks? slang how are you?
turn a trick slang (of a prostitute) to gain a customer

verb

to defraud, deceive, or cheat (someone), esp by means of a trick
Derived Formstricker, nountrickless, adjective

Word Origin for trick

C15: from Old Northern French trique, from trikier to deceive, from Old French trichier, ultimately from Latin trīcārī to play tricks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tricked

trick

n.

early 15c., "a cheat, a mean ruse," from Old North French trique "trick, deceit, treachery, cheating," from trikier "to deceive, to cheat," variant of Old French trichier, probably from Vulgar Latin *triccare, from Latin tricari "be evasive, shuffle," from tricæ "trifles, nonsense, a tangle of difficulties," of unknown origin.

Meaning "a roguish prank" is recorded from 1580s; sense of "the art of doing something" is first attested 1610s. Meaning "prostitute's client" is first attested 1915; earlier it was U.S. slang for "a robbery" (1865). Trick-or-treat is recorded from 1942.

trick

v.

1590s, from trick (v.). Related: Tricked; tricking. An earlier sense of "to dress, adorn" (c.1500) is perhaps a different word entirely.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with tricked

trick

In addition to the idioms beginning with trick

  • trick or treat
  • trick out
  • tricks of the trade

also see:

  • bag of tricks
  • confidence game (trick)
  • dirty tricks
  • do the trick
  • hat trick
  • how's tricks
  • not miss a trick
  • teach an old dog new tricks
  • that does it (the trick)
  • turn a trick
  • up to one's old tricks
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.