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triglyceride

[ trahy-glis-uh-rahyd, -er-id ]

noun

, Biochemistry, Chemistry.
  1. an ester obtained from glycerol by the esterification of three hydroxyl groups with fatty acids, naturally occurring in animal and vegetable tissues: an important energy source forming much of the fat stored by the body.


triglyceride

/ traɪˈɡlɪsəˌraɪd /

noun

  1. any ester of glycerol and one or more carboxylic acids, in which each glycerol molecule has combined with three carboxylic acid molecules. Most natural fats and oils are triglycerides


triglyceride

/ trī-glĭsə-rīd′ /

  1. Any of a class of organic compounds that are esters consisting of three fatty acids joined to glycerol. The fatty acids may be the same or may be different. Triglycerides are the chief lipids constituting fats and oils and function to store chemical energy in plants and animals.


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Word History and Origins

Origin of triglyceride1

First recorded in 1855–60; tri- + glyceride

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Example Sentences

It’s the omega-3-rich kind of fat that may actually lower triglycerides.

This oil contains much triglyceride of an unsaturated relative of stearic acid.

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