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trollop

[trol-uh p]
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noun
  1. an immoral or promiscuous woman, especially a prostitute.
  2. an untidy or slovenly woman; slattern.
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Origin of trollop

1605–15; earlier trollops; perhaps akin to troll1
Related formstrol·lop·y, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for trollop

Historical Examples

  • "But Christian Killip is nothing but a trollop, anyway, sir," said Csar.

    The Manxman

    Hall Caine

  • We have been Dickens'd and Trollop'd, and it should do us good.

  • I should think you'd want to hide your face in shame, you trollop.

  • "She's no more of a trollop than you are," said he, with spirit.

  • No, I am afraid not—if you have resumed your principles, Mr. Trollop.

    The Gilded Age, Complete

    Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner


British Dictionary definitions for trollop

trollop

noun
  1. a promiscuous woman, esp a prostitute
  2. an untidy woman; slattern
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Derived Formstrollopy, adjective

Word Origin

C17: perhaps from German dialect Trolle prostitute; perhaps related to trull
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for trollop

1610s, "slovenly woman," probably from troll (v.) in sense of "roll about, wallow."

[A] certain Anne Hayward, wife of Gregory Hayward of Beighton, did in the parishe church of Beighton aforesaid in the time of Divine Service or Sermon there, and when the Minister was reading & praying, violently & boisterously presse & enter into the seat or place where one Elizabeth, wife of Robert Spurlinir, was quietly at her Devotion & Duty to Almighty God and then and there did quarrel chide & braule & being evilly & inalitiously bent did use then and there many rayleing opprobrious Speeches & Invectives against the said Elizabeth calling her Tripe & Trallop, to the great disturbance both of the Minister and Congregation. [Archdeaconry of Sudbury, Suffolk, Court Proceedings, 1682]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper