Dictionary.com

troll

1
[ trohl ]
/ troʊl /
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See synonyms for: troll / trolled / trolling / troller on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
verb (used without object)
noun
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Origin of troll

1
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English trollen “to roll, stroll,” from Middle French troller “to run here and there, ramble,” from Middle High German trollen “to walk or run with short steps”; defs. 4, 11, 17 are influenced by troll2

OTHER WORDS FROM troll

troller, nounun·trolled, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH troll

trawl, troll

Other definitions for troll (2 of 2)

troll2
[ trohl ]
/ troʊl /

noun
(in Scandinavian folklore) any of a race of supernatural beings, sometimes conceived as giants and sometimes as dwarfs, inhabiting caves or subterranean dwellings.
Slang. a person who lives or sleeps in a park or under a viaduct or bridge, as a derelict or poor person.

Origin of troll

2
First recorded in 1610–20; from Old Norse troll “demon, fiend”
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

MORE ABOUT TROLL

What does troll mean?

A troll is someone who harasses other people online to try to get a negative reaction from them. To troll someone is to harass them.

The online troll is related to the trolls of legend and fiction, supernatural creatures that live in caves or other underground places. In such stories, trolls are monsters that are unfriendly to humans and sometimes kidnap them. The online sense of troll likens such people to monsters lurking and waiting for the chance to harass others.

As a verb, troll also means to fish along a moving line, such as a line that trails behind a moving boat. When you move the fishing line or bait on such a line, that too is to troll.

Example: I trolled my fishing line a little and ended up catching a big fish.

Where does troll come from?

The first records of the verb troll come from around 1350. It ultimately comes from the Middle High German trollen, meaning “to walk or run with short steps.” The first records of the noun troll come from around 1610. It comes from the Old Norse troll meaning “demon.”

In most discussions, most people will think of the monstrous creatures and people who act like them. Internet trolls are known to spread purposely false or inflammatory messages online to upset and mislead people. The best way to deal with online trolls is not to feed them. In other words, don’t respond to them, because that encourages them to continue behaving badly.

Did you know … ?

What are some other forms related to troll?

  • troller (noun)
  • untrolled (adjective)

What are some synonyms for troll?

What are some words that often get used in discussing troll?

How is troll used in real life?

Troll has several meanings, but you’ll most likely see the harassment meaning used online.

 

 

Try using troll!

Is troll used correctly in the following sentence?

Some troll tried to get me riled up online today, but I just ignored it.

How to use troll in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for troll (1 of 2)

troll1
/ (trəʊl) /

verb
noun

Derived forms of troll

troller, noun

Word Origin for troll

C14: from Old French troller to run about; related to Middle High German trollen to run with short steps

British Dictionary definitions for troll (2 of 2)

troll2
/ (trəʊl) /

noun
(in Scandinavian folklore) one of a class of supernatural creatures that dwell in caves or mountains and are depicted either as dwarfs or as giants

Word Origin for troll

C19: from Old Norse: demon; related to Danish trold
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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