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turnoff

[ turn-awf, -of ]
/ ˈtɜrnˌɔf, -ˌɒf /
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noun
a small road that branches off from a larger one, especially a ramp or exit leading off a major highway: He took the wrong turnoff and it took him some 15 minutes to get back on the turnpike.
a place at which one diverges from or changes a former course.
an act of turning off.
the finished product of a certain manufacturing process, as weaving.
the quantity of fattened livestock distributed to market.
Slang. something or someone that makes one unsympathetic or antagonistic.
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Origin of turnoff

First recorded in 1680–90; noun use of verb phrase turn off
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use turnoff in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for turnoff

turn off

verb
noun turn-off
a road or other way branching off from the main thoroughfare
informal a person or thing that elicits dislike or distaste
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with turnoff

turn off

1

Stop the operation, activity, or flow of; shut off, as in Turn off the lights when you leave. [Mid-1800s]

2

Affect with dislike, revulsion, or boredom; cause to lose interest. For example, That vulgar comedian turned us off completely, or The movie was all right for an hour or so, but then I was turned off. [Slang; mid-1900s]

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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