tush

1
[tuhsh]
See more synonyms for tush on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. an exclamation of “tush!”

Origin of tush

1
late Middle English word dating back to 1400–50

tush

2
[tuhsh]
noun
  1. one of the four canine teeth of the horse.
  2. Chiefly Midland and Southern U.S. a tusk.

Origin of tush

2
before 900; Middle English; Old English tusc. See tusk
Related formstushed, adjective

tush

3
[too sh]
noun Slang.
  1. tushie.

Origin of tush

3
see origin at tushie
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for tush

Historical Examples of tush

  • After a while, he said aloud, no one understanding rightly what he meant, 'Tush!

    Curious, if True

    Elizabeth Gaskell

  • "Tush, boy; promise must yield to need," said the Knight of the Crested Boar.

    Historic Boys

    Elbridge Streeter Brooks

  • He has many fine quips at this folly of plain dealing, but his "tush!"

  • Dick said, “Thank you,” for the promised “tush,” and walked away.

    Dick o' the Fens

    George Manville Fenn

  • Tush, Colonna, see you not that if we had balked this great warrior, we had perished?

    Rienzi

    Edward Bulwer Lytton


British Dictionary definitions for tush

tush

1
interjection
  1. archaic an exclamation of disapproval or contempt

Word Origin for tush

C15: Middle English, of imitative origin

tush

2
noun
  1. rare a small tusk

Word Origin for tush

Old English tūsc; see tusk

tush

3
noun
  1. US slang the buttocks

Word Origin for tush

C20: from Yiddish tokhes, from Hebrew tahath beneath
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for tush
n.

"backside, buttocks," 1962, an abbreviation of tochus (1914), from Yiddish tokhes, from Hebrew tahat "beneath."

interj.

mid-15c.; see tut.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper