fabricate

[ fab-ri-keyt ]
/ ˈfæb rɪˌkeɪt /
|

verb (used with object), fab·ri·cat·ed, fab·ri·cat·ing.

to make by art or skill and labor; construct: The finest craftspeople fabricated this clock.
to make by assembling parts or sections.
to devise or invent (a legend, lie, etc.).
to fake; forge (a document, signature, etc.).

Origin of fabricate

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin fabricātus made, past participle of fabricāre. See fabric, -ate1
Related forms

Synonym study

1. See manufacture.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unfabricated

  • Our unfabricated building-steel is piled ready for erection—under two thousand feet of sand.

    Sand Doom|William Fitzgerald Jenkins

British Dictionary definitions for unfabricated

fabricate

/ (ˈfæbrɪˌkeɪt) /

verb (tr)

to make, build, or construct
to devise, invent, or concoct (a story, lie, etc)
to fake or forge
Derived Formsfabrication, nounfabricative, adjectivefabricator, noun

Word Origin for fabricate

C15: from Latin fabricāre to build, make, from fabrica workshop; see fabric
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unfabricated

fabricate


v.

mid-15c., "to fashion, make, build," from Latin fabricatus, past participle of fabricare "make, construct, fashion, build," from fabrica (see fabric). In bad sense of "to tell a lie," etc., it is recorded by 1779. Related: Fabricated; fabricating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper