Origin of factor

1400–50; late Middle English facto(u)r < Latin factor maker, perpetrator, equivalent to fac(ere) to make, do + -tor -tor
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for unfactored

factor

/ (ˈfæktə) /

noun

verb

(intr) to engage in the business of a factor
See also factor in
Derived Formsfactorable, adjectivefactorability, nounfactorship, noun

Word Origin for factor

C15: from Latin: one who acts, from facere to do

usage

Factor (sense 1) should only be used to refer to something which contributes to a result. It should not be used to refer to a part of something such as a plan or arrangement; instead a word such as component or element should be used
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for unfactored

factor

[ făktər ]

n.

One that contributes in the cause of an action.
A mathematical component that by multiplication makes up a number or expression.
A gene.
A substance, such as a vitamin, that functions in a specific biochemical reaction or bodily process, such as blood coagulation.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Science definitions for unfactored

factor

[ făktər ]

Noun

One of two or more numbers or expressions that are multiplied to obtain a given product. For example, 2 and 3 are factors of 6, and a + b and a - b are factors of a2 - b2.
A substance found in the body, such as a protein, that is essential to a biological process. For example, growth factors are needed for proper cell growth and development.

Verb

To find the factors of a number or expression. For example, the number 12 can be factored into 2 and 6, or 3 and 4, or 1 and 12.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.