mollify

[ mol-uh-fahy ]
/ ˈmɒl əˌfaɪ /
See synonyms for: mollify / mollified / mollification / mollifyingly on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), mol·li·fied, mol·li·fy·ing.

to soften in feeling or temper, as a person; pacify; appease.
to mitigate or reduce; soften: to mollify one's demands.

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Origin of mollify

1350–1400; Middle English <Middle French mollifier<Late Latin mollificāre, equivalent to Latin molli(s) soft + -ficāre-fy

OTHER WORDS FROM mollify

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for mollify

  • Trigger, unmollified, pointed out that the p. 58 methods he'd used not to worry her hardly had been soothing.

    Legacy|James H Schmitz
  • "And I'm wantin' my profit from what we could sell," Pence added, unmollified.

    The Heritage of the Hills|Arthur P. Hankins
  • "I thought soldiers never indulged in such feelings," continued the unmollified Aunt Maria.

    Overland|John William De Forest
  • Percy coloured slightly, unmollified by being in the same boat with the satirist.

British Dictionary definitions for mollify

mollify
/ (ˈmɒlɪˌfaɪ) /

verb -fies, -fying or -fied (tr)

to pacify; soothe
to lessen the harshness or severity of

Derived forms of mollify

mollifiable, adjectivemollification, nounmollifier, noun

Word Origin for mollify

C15: from Old French mollifier, via Late Latin, from Latin mollis soft + facere to make
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012