profane

[pruh-feyn, proh-]

adjective

verb (used with object), pro·faned, pro·fan·ing.

to misuse (anything that should be held in reverence or respect); defile; debase; employ basely or unworthily.
to treat (anything sacred) with irreverence or contempt; violate the sanctity of: to profane a shrine.

Origin of profane

1350–1400; (adj.) < Latin profānus literally, before (outside of) the temple; replacing Middle English prophane < Medieval Latin prophānus desecrated (see pro-1, fane); (v.) < Latin profānāre, derivative of profānus; replacing Middle English prophanen < Medieval Latin prophānāre to desecrate
Related formspro·fane·ly, adverbpro·fane·ness, nounpro·fan·er, nounhalf-pro·fane, adjectivenon·pro·fane, adjectivenon·pro·fane·ly, adverbnon·pro·fane·ness, nounsem·i·pro·fane, adjectivesem·i·pro·fane·ly, adverbsem·i·pro·fane·ness, nounun·pro·fane, adjectiveun·pro·fane·ly, adverbun·pro·fane·ness, nounun·pro·faned, adjective
Can be confusedlewd obscene pornographic profanatory profane

Synonyms for profane

Antonyms for profane

1. sacred. 2. spiritual. 3. holy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for unprofaned

Historical Examples of unprofaned

  • Their summits glittered under the blue skies, crowned with silvery snows, unprofaned by the foot of man.

    The Little Lady of Lagunitas

    Richard Henry Savage

  • I discovered that my house actually had its site in such a withdrawn, but forever new and unprofaned, part of the universe.

  • I look upon a realm celestial in its beauty, unprofaned by earthly sign or sound.

    Pastoral Days

    William Hamilton Gibson

  • Moved by curiosity to explore the recesses of a tomb as yet unprofaned by tourists, my friend bribed the Arabs to show it to him.

    Cleopatra

    H. Rider Haggard


British Dictionary definitions for unprofaned

profane

adjective

having or indicating contempt, irreverence, or disrespect for a divinity or something sacred
not designed or used for religious purposes; secular
not initiated into the inner mysteries or sacred rites
vulgar, coarse, or blasphemousprofane language

verb (tr)

to treat or use (something sacred) with irreverence
to put to an unworthy or improper use
Derived Formsprofanation (ˌprɒfəˈneɪʃən), nounprofanatory (prəˈfænətərɪ, -trɪ), adjectiveprofanely, adverbprofaneness, nounprofaner, noun

Word Origin for profane

C15: from Latin profānus outside the temple, from pro- 1 + fānum temple
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unprofaned

profane

v.

late 14c., from Old French profaner, prophaner (13c.) and directly from Latin profanare "to desecrate, render unholy, violate," from profanus "unholy, not consecrated" (see profane (adj.)). Related: Profaned; profaning.

profane

adj.

mid-15c., "un-ecclesiastical, secular," from Old French profane (12c.) and directly from Latin profanus "unholy, not consecrated," according to Barnhart from pro fano "not admitted into the temple (with the initiates)," literally "out in front of the temple," from pro- "before" (see pro-) + fano, ablative of fanum "temple" (see feast (n.)). Sense of "unholy, polluted" is recorded from c.1500. Related: Profanely.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper