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propitious

[pruh-pish-uh s]
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adjective
  1. presenting favorable conditions; favorable: propitious weather.
  2. indicative of favor; auspicious: propitious omens.
  3. favorably inclined; disposed to bestow favors or forgive: propitious gods.
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Origin of propitious

1400–50; late Middle English propicius < Latin propitius favorably inclined, propitious, probably equivalent to pro- pro-1 + -pit-, combining form of petere to head for, resort to, solicit + -ius adj. suffix; see -ous
Related formspro·pi·tious·ly, adverbpro·pi·tious·ness, nounun·pro·pi·tious, adjectiveun·pro·pi·tious·ly, adverbun·pro·pi·tious·ness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words

adverseantagonisticcontraryillinauspiciousominousthreatening

Examples from the Web for unpropitious

Historical Examples

  • Victims were sacrificed, and the omens declared not unpropitious.

    Philothea

    Lydia Maria Child

  • If the weather should be unpropitious the festival was to be in the church vestry.

    The Rise of Roscoe Paine

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • Elevation is unpropitious to the display of his more amiable qualities.

    Glances at Europe

    Horace Greeley

  • In England, after an unpropitious summer, the remark is often made, "We have had no summer!"

  • Our next voyage in the Romulus was unpropitious from the start.


British Dictionary definitions for unpropitious

propitious

adjective
  1. favourable; auguring well
  2. gracious or favourably inclined
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Derived Formspropitiously, adverbpropitiousness, noun

Word Origin

C15: from Latin propitius well disposed, from prope close to
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unpropitious

adj.

c.1600 (implied in unpropitiously), from un- (1) "not" + propitious.

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propitious

adj.

mid-15c., from Anglo-French propicius, Old French propicius "gracious, favorable, useful" (12c., Modern French propice) and directly from Latin propitius "favorable, kind, gracious, well-disposed" (see propitiation). Earlier English form was propice, from Old French propice. Related: Propitiously.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper