prove

[ proov ]
/ pruv /

verb (used with object), proved, proved or prov·en, prov·ing.

verb (used without object), proved, proved or prov·en, prov·ing.

Origin of prove

1125–75; Middle English proven < Old French prover < Latin probāre to try, test, prove, approve, derivative of probus good. See probity

Related forms

Usage note

Either proved or proven is standard as the past participle of prove : Events have proved (or proven ) him wrong. As a modifier, proven is by far the more common: a proven fact.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for unproved

British Dictionary definitions for unproved (1 of 2)

unproved

/ (ʌnˈpruːvd) /

adjective

not having been established as true, valid, or possible

British Dictionary definitions for unproved (2 of 2)

prove

/ (pruːv) /

verb proves, proving, proved, proved or proven (mainly tr)


Derived Forms

provable, adjectiveprovability, nounprovably, adverb

Word Origin for prove

C12: from Old French prover, from Latin probāre to test, from probus honest
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with unproved

prove

In addition to the idiom beginning with prove

  • prove out

also see:

  • exception proves the rule

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.