redeemable

[ri-dee-muh-buh l]
Also re·demp·ti·ble [ri-demp-tuh-buh l] /rɪˈdɛmp tə bəl/.

Origin of redeemable

First recorded in 1605–15; redeem + -able
Related formsre·deem·a·bil·i·ty, re·deem·a·ble·ness, nounre·deem·a·bly, adverbnon·re·deem·a·ble, adjectivenon·re·demp·ti·ble, adjectiveun·re·deem·a·ble, adjectiveun·re·deem·a·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for unredeemable

Contemporary Examples of unredeemable

  • For the right audience—social conservatives—this ad could be very powerful in spite of his other unredeemable gaffes.

    The Daily Beast logo
    A User’s Guide to the Iowa Air Wars

    Judith Grey

    January 2, 2012

  • After all, even the vicious and unredeemable are entitled to the protections the judicial system is supposed to provide.

    The Daily Beast logo
    A Killing in Texas

    Richard Bernstein

    March 10, 2009

  • Niven has created an unredeemable monster of a narrator, but a very funny one, indeed.

    The Daily Beast logo
    The Sound of Violence

    Taylor Antrim

    February 17, 2009

Historical Examples of unredeemable


British Dictionary definitions for unredeemable

redeemable

redemptible (rɪˈdɛmptəbəl)

adjective (of bonds, shares, etc)
  1. subject to cancellation by repayment at a specified date or under specified conditions
  2. payable in or convertible into cash
Derived Formsredeemability, nounredeemably, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unredeemable

redeemable

adj.

1610s, from redeem + -able.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper