revive

[ ri-vahyv ]
/ rɪˈvaɪv /
|

verb (used with object), re·vived, re·viv·ing.

verb (used without object), re·vived, re·viv·ing.

Origin of revive

1375–1425; late Middle English reviven < Latin revīvere to live again, equivalent to re- re- + vīvere to live, be alive; cf. vital
SYNONYMS FOR revive
ANTONYMS FOR revive
2 kill.
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for unrevivable

revive

/ (rɪˈvaɪv) /

verb

Derived Forms

Word Origin for revive

C15: from Old French revivre to live again, from Latin revīvere, from re- + vīvere to live; see vivid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for unrevivable

revive


v.

early 15c., "return to consciousness; restore to health," from Middle French revivre (10c.), from Latin revivere "to live again," from re- "again" (see re-) + vivere "to live" (see vital). Meaning "bring back to notice or fashion" is from mid-15c. Related: Revived; reviving.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Medicine definitions for unrevivable

revive

[ rĭ-vīv ]

v.

To bring back to life or consciousness; resuscitate.
To regain health, vigor, or good spirits.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.