usurer

[yoo-zher-er]
noun
  1. a person who lends money and charges interest, especially at an exorbitant or unlawful rate; moneylender.
  2. Obsolete. a person who lends money at interest.

Origin of usurer

1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French < Medieval Latin ūsūrārius, equivalent to ūsūr(ia) usury + Latin -ārius -ary
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018


Examples from the Web for usurers

Historical Examples of usurers

  • At the advent of the three usurers a new impulse seized the people.

    The Scapegoat

    Hall Caine

  • Usurers were the open representatives of flagrant covetousness in all the ages.

    Usury

    Calvin Elliott

  • These public bonds are the golden opportunity of the usurers.

    Usury

    Calvin Elliott

  • He but yields himself as a tool to the usurers to continue their loans.

    Usury

    Calvin Elliott

  • The usurers received their hold on the state in a time of the greatest need.

    Usury

    Calvin Elliott


British Dictionary definitions for usurers

usurer

noun
  1. a person who lends funds at an exorbitant rate of interest
  2. obsolete a moneylender
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for usurers

usurer

n.

late 13c., from Old French usurier, from Medieval Latin usurarius "usurer," from Latin adj. usurarius "pertaining to interest," from usura (see usury).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper