ary

[ air-ee ]
/ ˈɛər i /

adjective Chiefly Midland and Southern U.S.

any; anyone.
none, not any; nary.

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"The Handmaid's Tale" was required reading for many of us in school. Everyone else has probably watched the very popular and addictive TV show. Do you remember this vocabulary from the book, and do you know what these terms mean?
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decorum

Origin of ary

First recorded in 1810–20; alteration of e'er a ever a, in sense “any”

Definition for ary (2 of 2)

-ary

a suffix occurring originally in loanwords from Classical and Medieval Latin, on adjectives (elementary; honorary; stationary; tributary), personal nouns (actuary; notary; secretary), or nouns denoting objects, especially receptacles or places (library; rosary; glossary). The suffix has the general sense “pertaining to, connected with” the referent named by the base; it is productive in English, sometimes with the additional senses “contributing to,” “for the purpose of,” and usually forming adjectives: complimentary; visionary; revolutionary; inflationary.

Origin of -ary

Middle English -arie < Latin -ārius, -a, -um; E personal nouns reflect -ārius, objects and places -ārium or -āria; inherited and adopted French forms of this suffix are -er2, -eer, -ier2, -aire; cf. -er1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ary

British Dictionary definitions for ary

-ary

suffix

(forming adjectives) of; related to; belonging tocautionary; rudimentary
(forming nouns)
  1. a person connected with or engaged inmissionary
  2. a thing relating to; a place forcommentary; aviary

Word Origin for -ary

from Latin -ārius, -āria, -ārium
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012