villainage

or vil·lan·age

[vil-uh-nij]

villeinage

or vil·lain·age, vil·lan·age, vil·len·age

[vil-uh-nij]
noun
  1. the tenure by which a villein held land and tenements from a lord.
  2. the condition or status of a villein.

Origin of villeinage

1275–1325; Middle English vilenage < Anglo-French, Old French. See villein, -age
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for villainage

Historical Examples of villainage

  • I have had to speak of prescription as a source of villainage.

    Villainage in England

    Paul Vinogradoff

  • Now the obligation to serve as reeve was taken as a mark of villainage.

    Villainage in England

    Paul Vinogradoff

  • It is a stepping-stone from villainage to socage, or rather to socman's tenure.

    Villainage in England

    Paul Vinogradoff

  • The men of ancient demesne are men of free blood holding in villainage.

    Villainage in England

    Paul Vinogradoff

  • On the other hand, 'regardant' is used quite independently of villainage.

    Villainage in England

    Paul Vinogradoff


British Dictionary definitions for villainage

villainage

noun
  1. a variant spelling of villeinage

villeinage

villainage

noun (in medieval Europe)
  1. the status and condition of a villein
  2. the tenure by which a villein held his land
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012