wallow

[ wol-oh ]
/ ˈwɒl oʊ /

verb (used without object)

to roll about or lie in water, snow, mud, dust, or the like, as for refreshment: Goats wallowed in the dust.
to live self-indulgently; luxuriate; revel: to wallow in luxury; to wallow in sentimentality.
to flounder about; move along or proceed clumsily or with difficulty: A gunboat wallowed toward port.
to surge up or billow forth, as smoke or heat: Waves of black smoke wallowed into the room.

noun

Origin of wallow

before 900; Middle English walwe, Old English wealwian to roll; cognate with Gothic walwjan; akin to Latin volvere
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wallowing

British Dictionary definitions for wallowing

wallow

/ (ˈwɒləʊ) /

verb (intr)

(esp of certain animals) to roll about in mud, water, etc, for pleasure
to move about with difficulty
to indulge oneself in possessions, emotion, etcto wallow in self-pity
(of smoke, waves, etc) to billow

noun

the act or an instance of wallowing
a muddy place or depression where animals wallow
Derived Formswallower, noun

Word Origin for wallow

Old English wealwian to roll (in mud); related to Latin volvere to turn, Greek oulos curly, Russian valun round pebble
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for wallowing

wallow


v.

Old English wealwian "to roll," from West Germanic *walwojan, from PIE *wel- "to roll" (see volvox). Figurative sense of "to plunge and remain in some state or condition" is attested from early 13c. Related: Wallowed; wallowing. The noun is recorded from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper