lurch

1
[ lurch ]
/ lɜrtʃ /

noun

an act or instance of swaying abruptly.
a sudden tip or roll to one side, as of a ship or a staggering person.
an awkward, swaying or staggering motion or gait.

verb (used without object)

(of a ship) to roll or pitch suddenly.
to make a lurch; move with lurches; stagger: The wounded man lurched across the room.

Origin of lurch

1
First recorded in 1760–70; origin uncertain
Related formslurch·ing·ly, adverb

Definition for lurch (2 of 3)

lurch

2
[ lurch ]
/ lɜrtʃ /

noun

a situation at the close of various games in which the loser scores nothing or is far behind the opponent.

Origin of lurch

2
1525–35; < Middle French lourche a game, noun use of lourche (adj.) discomfited < Germanic; compare Middle High German lurz left (hand), Old English belyrtan to deceive

Definition for lurch (3 of 3)

lurch

3
[ lurch ]
/ lɜrtʃ /

verb (used with object)

Archaic. to do out of; defraud; cheat.
Obsolete. to acquire through underhanded means; steal; filch.

verb (used without object)

British Dialect. to lurk near a place; prowl.

noun

Archaic. the act of lurking or state of watchfulness.

Origin of lurch

3
1375–1425; late Middle English lorchen, apparently variant of lurken to lurk
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for lurch

British Dictionary definitions for lurch (1 of 3)

lurch

1
/ (lɜːtʃ) /

verb (intr)

to lean or pitch suddenly to one side
to stagger or sway

noun

the act or an instance of lurching
Derived Formslurching, adjective

Word Origin for lurch

C19: origin unknown

British Dictionary definitions for lurch (2 of 3)

lurch

2
/ (lɜːtʃ) /

noun

leave someone in the lurch to desert someone in trouble
cribbage the state of a losing player with less than 30 points at the end of a game (esp in the phrase in the lurch)

Word Origin for lurch

C16: from French lourche a game similar to backgammon, apparently from lourche (adj) deceived, probably of Germanic origin

British Dictionary definitions for lurch (3 of 3)

lurch

3
/ (lɜːtʃ) /

verb

(intr) archaic, or dialect to prowl or steal about suspiciously

Word Origin for lurch

C15: perhaps a variant of lurk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with lurch

lurch


see leave in the lurch.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.