ware

2
[wair]Archaic.
verb (used with object), wared, war·ing.
  1. to beware of (usually used in the imperative).

Origin of ware

2
before 900; Middle English (adj. and v.); Old English wær (adj.); cognate with German gewahr aware, Old Norse varr

ware

3
[wair]
verb (used with object), wared, war·ing. Scot. and North England.
  1. to spend; expend.

Origin of ware

3
1300–50; Middle English < Old Norse verja to spend, invest
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for waring

Contemporary Examples of waring

Historical Examples of waring


British Dictionary definitions for waring

ware

1
noun (often in combination)
  1. (functioning as singular) articles of the same kind or materialglassware; silverware
  2. porcelain or pottery of a specified typeagateware; jasper ware
See also wares

Word Origin for ware

Old English waru; related to Old Frisian were, Old Norse vara, Middle Dutch Ware

ware

2
verb
  1. another word for beware
adjective
  1. another word for wary, wise 1

Word Origin for ware

Old English wær; related to Old Saxon, Old High German giwar, Old Norse varr, Gothic war, Latin vereor. See aware, beware

ware

3
verb
  1. (tr) Northern English and British dialect to spend or squander

Word Origin for ware

C15: of Scandinavian origin; related to Icelandic verja
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for waring

Waring

brand name of a type of food processor, 1948, manufactured by Waring Products Corp., N.Y., U.S.

ware

n.

"manufactured goods, goods for sale," Old English waru, probably originally "object of care, that which is kept in custody," from Proto-Germanic *waro (cf. Swedish vara, Danish vare, Old Frisian were, Middle Dutch were, Dutch waar, Middle High German, German ware "goods"); related to Old English wær "aware, cautious" (see wary). Usually wares, except in compounds such as hardware, earthenware, etc. Lady ware was a jocular 17c. euphemism for "a woman's private parts," and Middle English had ape-ware "deceptive or false ware; tricks" (mid-13c.).

ware

v.

"to take heed of, beware," Old English warian "to guard against," from Proto-Germanic *warojan, from *waro- "to guard, watch" (cf. Old Frisian waria, Old Norse vara); related to Old English wær "aware" (see wary).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper