water line

or wa·ter·line

|

noun

Nautical. the part of the outside of a ship's hull that is just at the water level.
Naval Architecture. any of a series of lines on the hull plans of a vessel representing the level to which the vessel is immersed or the bottom of the keel.Compare load line, Plimsoll line.
the line in which water at its surface borders upon a floating body.
Also called watermark. a line indicating the former level or passage of water: A water line all around the cellar served as a reminder of the flood.
a pipe, hose, tube, or other line for conveying water.

Origin of water line

First recorded in 1615–25
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for waterline

Contemporary Examples of waterline

Historical Examples of waterline

  • One man said the ship had been struck above the waterline and would float.

    Tom Slade with the Colors

    Percy K. Fitzhugh

  • Five of the nine left of the Waterline outfit drove the herd.

    Rimrock Trail

    J. Allan Dunn

  • He had seen them before on their first unsuccessful trip to the Waterline.

    Rimrock Trail

    J. Allan Dunn

  • A moment later, and the whole schooner was ablaze, from waterline to masthead.

    The Black Buccaneer

    Stephen W. Meader

  • He drove me off'n the Waterline, him an' the ones that hang with him.

    Rimrock Trail

    J. Allan Dunn


British Dictionary definitions for waterline

water line

noun

a line marked at the level around a vessel's hull to which the vessel will be immersed when afloat
a line marking the level reached by a body of water
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for waterline
n.

1620s, line where the water rises to on the hull of a ship afloat, from water (n.1) + line (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper