Origin of orient

1350–1400; Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin orient- (stem of oriēns) “the east, sunrise,” noun use of present participle of orīrī “to rise”; see -ent

SYNONYMS FOR orient

Related forms

o·ri·ent·er, nounself-o·ri·ent·ed, adjectivewell-o·ri·ent·ed, adjective
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Examples from the Web for well-oriented

British Dictionary definitions for well-oriented (1 of 2)

Orient

/ (ˈɔːrɪənt) /

noun the Orient

the countries east of the Mediterranean
the eastern hemisphere

British Dictionary definitions for well-oriented (2 of 2)

orient


noun (ˈɔːrɪənt)

adjective (ˈɔːrɪənt)

mainly poetic eastern
archaic (of the sun, stars, etc) rising

verb (ˈɔːrɪˌɛnt)

Word Origin for orient

C18: via French from Latin oriēns rising (sun), from orīrī to rise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medicine definitions for well-oriented

orient

[ ôrē-ənt, -ĕnt′ ]

v.

To locate or place in a particular relation to the points of the compass.
To align or position with respect to a point or system of reference.
To make familiar with or adjusted to facts, principles, or a situation.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.