Dictionary.com

wick

1
[ wik ]
/ wɪk /
Save This Word!

noun
a bundle or loose twist or braid of soft threads, or a woven strip or tube, as of cotton or asbestos, which in a candle, lamp, oil stove, cigarette lighter, or the like, serves to draw up the melted tallow or wax or the oil or other flammable liquid to be burned.
verb (used with object)
to draw off (liquid) by capillary action.
QUIZ
ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?
We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.
Question 1 of 8
Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?
Meet Grammar CoachWrite or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar helpImprove Your Writing
Meet Grammar CoachImprove Your Writing
Write or paste your essay, email, or story into Grammar Coach and get grammar help

Origin of wick

1
First recorded before 1000; Middle English wek(e), wik(e), wicke, Old English wēoce; cognate with Middle Dutch wiecke, Middle Low German wêke, weike, Old High German wioh, wiohha “lint, wick,” German Wieke, Wike “lint”

OTHER WORDS FROM wick

wickless, adjective

Other definitions for wick (2 of 4)

wick2
[ wik ]
/ wɪk /

noun Curling.
a narrow opening in the field, bounded by other players' stones.

Origin of wick

2
Origin uncertain

Other definitions for wick (3 of 4)

wick3
[ wik ]
/ wɪk /

noun
British Dialect. a farm, especially a dairy farm.
Archaic. a village; hamlet.

Origin of wick

3
First recorded before 900; Middle English wik(e), wek(e), Old English wīc “residence, dwelling, house, village” (compare Old Saxon wīc, Old High German wîch ), from Latin vīcus “village, estate”; cognate with Greek oîkos, woîkos “house”

Other definitions for wick (4 of 4)

Wick
[ wik ]
/ wɪk /

noun
a town in the Highland region, in N Scotland: herring fisheries.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use wick in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for wick (1 of 4)

wick1
/ (wɪk) /

noun
a cord or band of loosely twisted or woven fibres, as in a candle, cigarette lighter, etc, that supplies fuel to a flame by capillary action
get on someone's wick British slang to cause irritation to a person

Derived forms of wick

wicking, noun

Word Origin for wick

Old English weoce; related to Old High German wioh, Middle Dutch wēke (Dutch wiek)

British Dictionary definitions for wick (2 of 4)

wick2
/ (wɪk) /

noun
archaic a village or hamlet

Word Origin for wick

Old English wīc; related to -wich in place names, Latin vīcus, Greek oîkos

British Dictionary definitions for wick (3 of 4)

wick3
/ (wɪk) /

adjective Northern English dialect
lively or active
alive or crawlinga dog wick with fleas

Word Origin for wick

dialect variant of quick alive

British Dictionary definitions for wick (4 of 4)

Wick
/ (wɪk) /

noun
a town in N Scotland, in Highland, at the head of Wick Bay (an inlet of the North Sea). Pop: 7333 (2001)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
FEEDBACK