wigwam

[wig-wom, -wawm]
See more synonyms for wigwam on Thesaurus.com

Origin of wigwam

1620–30, Americanism; < Eastern Abenaki wìkəwαm house < Proto-Algonquian *wi·kiwa·ʔmi; cf. wickiup
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for wigwam

dwelling, shelter, lodge, home, tent, wickiup, tepee

Examples from the Web for wigwam

Contemporary Examples of wigwam

  • From Dollywood to the Wigwam Village Motel, the country never looked so sweet as through the eyes of a pooch.

    The Daily Beast logo
    My Travels with Samantha

    David Jefferson

    April 17, 2012

Historical Examples of wigwam


British Dictionary definitions for wigwam

wigwam

noun
  1. any dwelling of the North American Indians, esp one made of bark, rushes, or skins spread over or enclosed by a set of arched poles lashed togetherCompare tepee
  2. a similar structure for children

Word Origin for wigwam

from Abnaki and Massachuset wīkwām, literally: their abode
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for wigwam
n.

1620s, from Algonquian (probably Eastern Abenaki) wikewam "a dwelling," said to mean literally "their house;" also said to be found in such formations as wikiwam and Ojibwa wiigiwaam and Delaware wiquoam.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper