wireless

[wahyuh r-lis]

adjective

noun

verb (used with or without object)

to telegraph or telephone by wireless.

Origin of wireless

First recorded in 1890–95; wire + -less
Related formswire·less·ly, adverbwire·less·ness, nounpre·wire·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wireless

Contemporary Examples of wireless

Historical Examples of wireless

  • Has charge of the Atlantic liners, wireless, and the seasick.

  • Our wireless experts agreed in pronouncing the theory absurd.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • It was that the explosion had been caused by waves from the wireless telegraph.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • What wireless stations are there in the city of Toulon, General?

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • "Yes, about the wireless," and Delcassé looked at him closely.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson



British Dictionary definitions for wireless

wireless

adjective

communicating without connecting wires or other material contactswireless networks; wireless internet connection

noun

mainly British old-fashioned another word for radio
Derived Formswirelessly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for wireless

1894, as a type of telegraph, from wire (n.) + -less. In reference to radio broadcasting, attested from 1903, subsequently superseded by radio.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper