wireless

[wahyuh r-lis]
See more synonyms for wireless on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. having no wire.
  2. noting or pertaining to any of various devices that are operated with or actuated by electromagnetic waves.
  3. Chiefly British. radio.
noun
  1. wireless telegraphy or telephony.
  2. a wireless telegraph or telephone, or the like.
  3. any system or device, as a cell phone, for transmitting messages or signals by electromagnetic waves.
  4. a wireless message.
  5. Chiefly British. radio.
verb (used with or without object)
  1. to telegraph or telephone by wireless.

Origin of wireless

First recorded in 1890–95; wire + -less
Related formswire·less·ly, adverbwire·less·ness, nounpre·wire·less, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for wireless

mobile, cellular, radio

Examples from the Web for wireless

Contemporary Examples of wireless

Historical Examples of wireless

  • Has charge of the Atlantic liners, wireless, and the seasick.

  • Our wireless experts agreed in pronouncing the theory absurd.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • It was that the explosion had been caused by waves from the wireless telegraph.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • "Yes, about the wireless," and Delcassé looked at him closely.

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson

  • What wireless stations are there in the city of Toulon, General?

    The Destroyer

    Burton Egbert Stevenson


British Dictionary definitions for wireless

wireless

adjective
  1. communicating without connecting wires or other material contactswireless networks; wireless internet connection
noun
  1. mainly British old-fashioned another word for radio
Derived Formswirelessly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for wireless

1894, as a type of telegraph, from wire (n.) + -less. In reference to radio broadcasting, attested from 1903, subsequently superseded by radio.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper