wise

1
[ wahyz ]
/ waɪz /
|||

adjective, wis·er, wis·est.

verb (used with object), wised, wis·ing.

Slang. to make wise or aware: I'll wise you, kid.

Verb Phrases

wise up, Slang. to make or become aware of a secret or generally unknown fact, situation, attitude, etc.: They wised him up on how to please the boss. She never wised up to the fact that the joke was on her.

Idioms

Origin of wise

1
before 900; Middle English (adj.), Old English wīs; cognate with Dutch wijs, German weise, Old Norse vīss, Gothic -weis; akin to wit1
Related formswise·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for wiser

British Dictionary definitions for wiser (1 of 2)

wise

1
/ (waɪz) /

adjective

verb

Derived Formswisely, adverbwiseness, noun

Word Origin for wise

Old English wīs; related to Old Norse vīss, Gothic weis, German weise

British Dictionary definitions for wiser (2 of 2)

wise

2
/ (waɪz) /

noun

archaic way, manner, fashion, or respect (esp in the phrases any wise, in no wise)

Word Origin for wise

Old English wīse manner; related to Old Saxon wīsa, German Weise, Old Norse vīsa verse, Latin vīsus face
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with wiser

wise


In addition to the idioms beginning with wise

  • wise guy
  • wise up to

also see:

  • get wise to
  • none the wiser
  • penny wise and pound foolish
  • put wise
  • sadder but wiser
  • word to the wise
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.