Advertisement

Advertisement

woodpecker

[ wood-pek-er ]

noun

  1. any of numerous climbing birds of the family Picidae, having a hard, chisel-like bill that it hammers repeatedly into wood in search of insects, stiff tail feathers to assist in climbing, and usually more or less boldly patterned plumage.


woodpecker

/ ˈwʊdˌpɛkə /

noun

  1. any climbing bird of the family Picidae, typically having a brightly coloured plumage and strong chisel-like bill with which they bore into trees for insects: order Piciformes


Discover More

Word History and Origins

Origin of woodpecker1

First recorded in 1520–30; wood 1 + pecker
Discover More

Example Sentences

If you’re protecting an old-growth swamp forest in Louisiana because you think it’s home to ivory-billed woodpeckers, for example, other species will likely benefit — whether or not the bird itself still exists.

From Vox

You might think it’s some Satanic ritual, but in reality, it’s the handiwork of an 8-inch-long woodpecker and its kin.

I’ve seen profusions of woodpeckers feasting on insects in dead trees.

Some birds, such as the red-cockaded woodpecker and California condor, are critically endangered.

It’s hard to say just how closely related Microraptor might have been to woodpecker ancestors, Gramling says.

The Texas native blasted the crew for being “hard as woodpecker lips.”

Centurus aurifrons dubius (Cabot): Golden-fronted Woodpecker.

Parvulorum, the wodewale is identified with the wodehake, woodpecker; whilst Hexham explains Du.

The birds were singing, black squirrels were jumping from bough to bough, and they could hear the tapping of the woodpecker.

As it passed out of the chimney, the soot left those long streaks of black which we see now on the woodpecker's back.

In the summer, they fished and swam in Singing River, and they shot their arrows into chipmunk and woodpecker holes.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement


wood owlwood pewee