yonder

[yon-der]
See more synonyms for yonder on Thesaurus.com
adjective
  1. being in that place or over there; being that or those over there: That road yonder is the one to take.
  2. being the more distant or farther: yonder side.
adverb
  1. at, in, or to that place specified or more or less distant; over there.

Origin of yonder

1250–1300; Middle English yonder, yender, equivalent to yond + -er as in hither, thither, etc.; akin to Dutch ginder, Gothic jaindre

yond

[yond]
adverb, adjective Archaic.
  1. yonder.

Origin of yond

before 900; Middle English; Old English geond; akin to Dutch ginds, Gothic jaind. See yon
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for yonder

yon, away, beyond, distant, farther, further, remote

Examples from the Web for yonder

Historical Examples of yonder

  • And how of the heap of trifles that you can see for yourselves in yonder corner?

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • Surely I see the red pile of Chandos at the head of yonder squadron!

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • "I thought that I should not need it in yonder inn, but I did," he answered.

    Fair Margaret

    H. Rider Haggard

  • "There is danger for you in that land of Spaniards, if ever we get yonder," said Peter meaningly.

    Fair Margaret

    H. Rider Haggard

  • Yonder, just in front of thee, lie my bow and arrows, likewise my broadsword.


British Dictionary definitions for yonder

yonder

adverb
  1. at, in, or to that relatively distant place; over there
determiner
  1. being at a distance, either within view or as if within viewyonder valleys

Word Origin for yonder

C13: from Old English geond yond; related to Old Saxon jendra, Old High German jenēr, Gothic jaind
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for yonder

c.1300, from Old English geond (see yond) + comp. suffix -er (2). Now replaced except in poetic usage by ungrammatical that.

yond

Old English geond (adv., prep.) "beyond, yonder," related to geon (see yon).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper