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hither

[ hith-er ]
/ ˈhɪð ər /
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adverb
to or toward this place: to come hither.
adjective
being on this or the closer side; nearer: the hither side of the meadow.
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Idioms about hither

    hither and thither, in various quarters; here and there: They scurried hither and thither to escape the rain.
    hither and yon, from here to over there, especially to a farther place; in or to a great many places: He looked hither and yon for the coin. She went hither and yon in search of an answer.

Origin of hither

First recorded before 900; Middle English, Old English hider; cognate with Old Norse hethra, Latin citer “on this side”

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH hither

hence, hither , thence, thither, whence, whither, yon
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How to use hither in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for hither

hither
/ (ˈhɪðə) /

adverb
to or towards this place (esp in the phrase come hither)Also (archaic): hitherward, hitherwards
hither and thither this way and that, as in a state of confusion
adjective
archaic, or dialect (of a side or part, esp of a hill or valley) nearer; closer

Word Origin for hither

Old English hider; related to Old Norse hethra here, Gothic hidrē, Latin citrā on this side, citrō
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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