History

  1. Black Lives Matter And 9 Other Influential Calls To Action You Should Know

    Black Lives Matter is a powerful political and social movement aiming to ensure basic human rights for Black people. Many people are familiar with the name of the movement as it is used amid protests against violence inflicted on Black people involving police officers, including the death of George Floyd in 2020. As the movement has expanded all around the world, many may not know …

  2. Why Is The Name “Jack” Used In So Many Nursery Rhymes and Fairy Tales?

    Since Jack went up the hill with Jill, Jack jumped over the candlestick, and Jack climbed the beanstalk (to name just a few of his exploits,) he must be wiped out. Doesn’t it seem like a disproportionate number of nursery rhymes and fairy tales contain a hero named Jack? Is this just a coincidence? What’s a nursery rhyme vs. a fairy tale?  First things first, …

  3. Jazz Slang Terms For Cool Hepcats

  4. 10 Words To Explain What Ramadan Is About

  5. What Is “Maundy Thursday,” And What Does “Maundy” Mean?

    No, Maundy Thursday is not a typo for Monday Thursday. Maundy Thursday—also known as Holy Thursday and Sheer Thursday, among other names—is a Christian holy day that commemorates events known as the Washing of the Feet and the Last Supper.  This day is part of the Holy Week leading up to Easter. Maundy Thursday comes after Holy Wednesday, and is followed immediately by Good Friday, …

  6. How Did April 1 Become “April Fools’ Day”?

    For pranksters and mischievous older siblings all around the world, April Fools’ Day, also called All Fools’ Day, is as eagerly anticipated as Christmas. After all, what other holiday encourages you to think up practical jokes and fool’s errands, from swapping your spouse’s keys to tricking your friend into thinking their car got towed? (Not cool, Steve.) But how did this odd, prank-centric holiday come …

  7. Origins And Uses Of 8 Common Sign-Offs

  8. Presidents’ Day Isn’t The Real Name Of This February Holiday

    If you live in the United States and you’re anything like us, you might view Presidents’ Day as just another three-day weekend in February. But the story behind this important commemorative holiday is more interesting than you might think—especially considering Presidents’ Day isn’t the official name of the holiday at all. When was the first Presidents’ Day? Presidents’ Day was first established in 1885 to …

  9. Where Did African American Vernacular English Come From?

    Dictionary.com’s United States of Diversity series by Taneesh Khera Welcome back to our United States of Diversity series, where we travel the country exploring the minority languages, dialects, and people that live here. In this episode, we’re happy to give you our tribute to African American Vernacular English (AAVE). Also called Black English or Ebonics, a blend of the words ebony and phonics, AAVE is …

  10. Getty

    Deepen Your Understanding Of Black History With These 10 Essential Terms