Tag Archives: category-grammar

  1. Punctuation Marks You Should Consider Using

    We’re all familiar with commas, periods, hyphens, and the like. Although semicolons can be confusing, we pretty much know what we’re doing when we punctuate a sentence. But don’t you get a little bored using the same old marks? Do you ever find yourself searching for the perfect way to convey a certain mood? As you’ll see, extra punctuation marks have been suggested at various …

  2. When Do You Use “Whom” vs. “Who”?

    Over the last 200 years, the pronoun whom has been on a steady decline. Despite its waning use in speech and ongoing speculation about its imminent extinction, whom still holds a spot in the English language, particularly in formal writing. Understanding when and how to use this pronoun can set your writing apart. If whom is on the decline, then who must be growing in popularity. The two—as …

  3. If A Word Ends In “S,” How Do You Make It Possessive?

    Second only to the use of the Oxford comma, the creation of possessives for words ending in S and the S sound is one of the most hotly debated grammar topics in the English language. The issue isn’t as cut and dried as some grammar rules, such as what punctuation is used to end a declarative sentence. (A period. Why can’t all grammar rules be this …

  4. “Affect” vs. “Effect”: Use The Correct Word Every Time

    Affect or effect? Both of these words are verbs and nouns and their meanings overlap. Very confusing! This slippery duo can send even experienced writers into a spiral of uncertainty. Especially, since many people pronounce them in almost the exact same way. Here’s a basic guideline for affect vs effect: Generally, we use affect as a verb (an action word) and effect as a noun …

  5. What Are The 6 Major Punctuation Marks?

    What happens when you mix up your punctuation? Well, there’s a million hilarious examples of grammatical mixups that point out the difference between—for example, Let’s eat Grandma vs. Let’s eat, Grandma. There’s even a grammar book named after the phrase eats shoots and leaves, which is what a panda does (as opposed to eats, shoots, and leaves). What a difference a comma can make! But …

  6. Crutch Words That Can Ruin Your Sentence

  7. How Do You Add Emphasis With Italics?

    If you’re thinking of using italics to emphasize words, keep in mind that the type of writing you do—and what style guide you follow—will determine how you use italics. Italics are typically used to show emphasis (For example: “I don’t care what he thinks. I do what I want!”) or to indicate titles of stand-alone works (Black Panther, Lost in Translation). Different style guides have …

  8. 5 Types Of Nouns That We Use All The Time

    Nouns come in a lot of different shapes and sizes. The major ones are common nouns, proper nouns, abstract nouns, possessive nouns, and collective nouns. First, what is a noun? A noun is a person, place, or thing. The category of things may sound super vague, but in this case it means inanimate objects, abstract concepts, and activities. Phrases and other parts of speech can also …

  9. Is It “St. Patrick’s Day” Or “St. Patricks Day”?

    Celebrated every March 17 (or sometimes the weekend before, the weekend after, or … actually, throughout the entire month of March), St. Patrick’s Day is the day people around the world celebrate St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland. Although the celebrations we see today—which often include parades, pub crawls, and corn beef and cabbage—have little to do with the original feasts that took place …

  10. Understanding When to Use Commas With Conjunctions

    Commas don’t have to be confusing. After all, you know what a comma is: the punctuation used to mark a division in a sentence, like the separation of words, phrases, a clause, or a sequence. And commas often accompany a conjunction, which is a word that connects phrases, clauses, or sentences (e.g., and, because, but, and however) or any other words or expressions that provide a …