Word of the Day

Thursday, November 14, 2019

ipso facto

[ ip-soh fak-toh ]

adverb

by the fact itself; by the very nature of the deed: to be condemned ipso facto.

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What is the origin of ipso facto?

First recorded in English in the mid-1500s, ipso facto is an adverb that comes directly from the Latin phrase ipsō factō “by the fact itself, by the very fact.” Ipso facto is often used when the very fact that one thing occurs is a direct consequence of another, as in “Having won all the gold medals in the sport’s Olympic events, she was ipso facto the best gymnast in the world.” Latin factō is the ablative form of factum “deed, act, fact,” and ipsō is the ablative of ipsum “very, same, itself,” among other senses. Ipso appears in other Latin expressions used in English, especially in law, including eo ipso “by that very fact” and ipso jure “by the law itself.”

how is ipso facto used?

… the notion that cars made in Germany would ipso facto be better crafted than others … this would have seemed curious indeed just a generation before.

Tony Judt, Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, 2005

I had, it seemed, defined myself as a “popular” writer, and if one is popular, then, ipso facto, one is not to be taken seriously.

Oliver Sacks, On the Move, 2015
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Wednesday, November 13, 2019

lacuna

[ luh-kyoo-nuh ]

noun

a gap or missing part, as in a manuscript, series, or logical argument; hiatus.

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What is the origin of lacuna?

In Latin lacūna means “ditch, pit, gap, deficiency, hole, hole where water collects.” Modern French lagune “lagoon,” Italian laguna “lagoon,” and Spanish laguna “lagoon, gap” are obvious developments from lacūna. Lacūna in turn is a derivative of lacus “basin, tub, cistern, pond, lake,” the source (through Old French) of English lake. Latin lacus is also related to Scots Gaelic and Irish loch. Lacuna entered English in the 17th century.

how is lacuna used?

I hardly know what to say after that, for there is a lacuna in the story, a line of verse missing from the elegy.

Gustave Flaubert (1821–1880), Memoirs of a Madman, translated by Andrew Brown, 2002

Attending to the mundane and the momentous, they punch in on the dark side of the clock, bridging the quiet lacuna between rush hours.

David Montgomery, "All in a Night's Work," Washington Post, August 20, 2000
Tuesday, November 12, 2019

gallimaufry

[ gal-uh-maw-free ]

noun

Chiefly Literary.

a hodgepodge; jumble; confused medley.

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What is the origin of gallimaufry?

Gallimaufry is an unusual but delightful word for “a hodgepodge; jumble; confused medley.” It was borrowed into English in the mid-1500s from Middle French galimafree, a kind of stew or hash, apparently concocted from a mishmash of ingredients. Galimafree may be its own etymological jumble, probably a conflation of French galer “to amuse oneself” and Picard mafrer (Picard is a language spoken in northern France) “to gorge oneself.” Like gallimaufry, other terms for a “confused medley” originally named food items composed of a mix of ingredients, including farrago, hodgepodge, and potpourri.

how is gallimaufry used?

Luncheons at Retta’s home were ridiculous affairs … There would be a gallimaufry of ices and trifles and toasts ….

Elizabeth Gilbert, The Signature of All Things, 2013

Yet this gallimaufry of satire, real history, fake history, and score-settling … never loses that relentless, fatiguing quality that is the hallmark of all books written out of an obsession.

David Leavitt, "The Making of Larry Kramer's Americans," The New Yorker, May 19, 2015

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