Word of the Day

Sunday, August 16, 2020

vicarious

[ vahy-kair-ee-uhs, vi- ]

adjective

felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others: a vicarious thrill.

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What is the origin of vicarious?

The adjective vicarious comes from the Latin adjective and noun vicārius “substituting, taking the place of another; one who takes over for or from another, a replacement or successor.” Vicārius is formed from the noun vicis (a genitive singular—the nominative singular does not occur) “a recurring occasion, a turn; an interchange or alternation,” and the adjective suffix –ārius, completely naturalized in English as –ary. Vicārius regularly becomes vicaire, vicar(e) in Old French, and vicar(e), vicair(e) in Middle English, with many meanings, including “one delegated with apostolic authority, such as a priest or the pope; a priest appointed to a parish in place of the regular priest or parson.” Vicarious entered English in the 17th century.

how is vicarious used?

Laying a sleeping bag on the hard metal floor of a rail car as it rumbles down the tracks is not for those accustomed to creature comforts. Yet his photographs of this life-on-the-edge experience illicit a vicarious thrill.

Alexa Keefe, "Not Your Typical Travelogue: A Photographer's Train-Hopping Adventures," National Geographic, September 28, 2015

Track and field are some of the most exciting events in the Olympic Games, but after the weeks of hype, the events themselves are so short … that it seems like they’re over before a casual fan has time to get a vicarious adrenaline rush.

Elspeth Reeve, "Get to Know the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Team Through GIFs," The Atlantic, July 24, 2012

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Saturday, August 15, 2020

jubilee

[ joo-buh-lee, joo-buh-lee ]

noun

the celebration of any of certain anniversaries, especially the fiftieth (golden jubilee).

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What is the origin of jubilee?

Jubilee comes from Middle English jubilee, jeubile, from Old French jubilee, jubilé, from Late Latin (annus) jūbilaeus “(year) of jubilee,” from the Greek adjective iōbēlaîos, from the noun iṓbēlos “jubilee,” from the Hebrew noun yōbhēl “ram’s horn, jubilee.” The change of the expected Latin spelling jōbēlaeus to jūbilaeus is due to the Latin verb jūbilāre “to shout for joy.” Jubilee first appears in John Wycliffe’s translation of the Bible in 1382.

how is jubilee used?

Few British monarchs have reached the 50-year milestone. King George III and Queen Victoria marked their golden jubilees with huge celebrations.

Ceylan Yeginsu, "Queen Elizabeth II’s Sapphire Jubilee Takes On Low-Key Tone," New York Times, February 6, 2017

To mark our silver jubilee, we look back at some of the biggest, brightest moments of the past 9,131 days.

"2008: Rachel Maddow Becomes First Queer Woman to Host Prime-Time News," Out, September 29, 2017

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Friday, August 14, 2020

de facto

[ dee fak-toh, dey ]

adverb, adjective

in fact; in reality: Although his title was prime minister, he was de facto president of the country.

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What is the origin of de facto?

The English adjective and adverb de facto, “in fact, really, in actuality (whether legal or illegal),” comes from the Latin phrase dē factō, from the preposition “of, from” and the noun factum “deed, act.” De facto is frequently contrasted with de jure, from the Latin phrase dē jūre “according to law, legally.” De facto entered English in the early 17th century.

how is de facto used?

Teachers will be safe at home, Hicks-Maxie noted. She doesn’t blame them. But she said that will leave child care workers as de facto teachers—at half the pay.

Nina Shapiro, "Hobbled by 1,000 closures, Washington's child care industry thrust into de facto teaching," Seattle Times, August 9, 2020

By choosing her as his political partner, Mr. Biden, if he wins, may well be anointing her as the de facto leader of the party in four or eight years.

Alexander Burns and , "Kamala Harris Is Biden's Choice for Vice President," New York Times, August 11, 2020

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