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Word of the Day
Wednesday, November 07, 2018

Definitions for dissemble

  1. to conceal one's true motives, thoughts, etc., by some pretense; speak or act hypocritically.
  2. to give a false or misleading appearance to; conceal the truth or real nature of: to dissemble one's incompetence in business.
  3. to put on the appearance of; feign: to dissemble innocence.

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Citations for dissemble
He counted heavily on his ability to dissemble, knowing that every decent lawyer had at least several drops of dissimulation in his blood. Elizabeth George, Missing Joseph, 1993
I didn't know how to dissemble, I quite openly acknowledged the mistakes I made, and didn't try hard to hide them. Johann Michael von Loën, The Honest Man at Court, 1748, translated by John R. Russell, 1997
Origin of dissemble
1490-1500
Dissemble comes from late Middle English dissemile, dissimill, an alteration of the verb dissimule (from Old French dissimuler “to keep one’s intentions hidden,” from Latin dissimulāre, “to disguise or conceal one’s thoughts”), and associated in form with the noun semblance and the obsolete verb semble (from Old French sembler, from Latin similāre and simulāre “to pretend”). Dissemble entered English in the sense “to pass over, ignore, neglect” in the 16th century.
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