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across

[uh-kraws, uh-kros] /əˈkrɔs, əˈkrɒs/
preposition
1.
from one side to the other of:
a bridge across a river.
2.
on or to the other side of; beyond:
across the sea.
3.
into contact with; into the presence of, usually by accident:
to come across an old friend; to run across a first edition of Byron.
4.
crosswise of or transversely to the length of something; athwart:
coats across the bed; straddled across the boundary line.
adverb
5.
from one side to another.
6.
on the other side:
We'll soon be across.
7.
crosswise; transversely:
with arms across.
8.
so as to be understood or learned:
He couldn't get the idea across to the class.
9.
into a desired or successful state:
to put a business deal across.
adjective
10.
being in a crossed or transverse position; crosswise:
an across pattern of supporting beams.
Origin of across
1470-1480
First recorded in 1470-80; a-1 + cross
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018.
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British Dictionary definitions for across

across

/əˈkrɒs/
preposition
1.
from one side to the other side of
2.
on or at the other side of
3.
so as to transcend boundaries or barriers: people united across borders by religion and history, the study of linguistics across cultures
4.
fully informed about; dealing with: we are across this problem
adverb
5.
from one side to the other
6.
on or to the other side
Word Origin
C13: on croice, acros, from Old French a croix crosswise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for across
adv.

early 14c., acros, earlier a-croiz (c.1300), from Anglo-French an cros "in a crossed position," literally "on cross" (see cross (n.)). Prepositional meaning "from one side to another" is first recorded 1590s; meaning "on the other side (as a result of crossing)" is from 1750. Phrase across the board originally is from horse-racing, in reference to a bet of the same amount of money on a horse to win, place, or show.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with across

across

In addition to the idiom beginning with
across
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Word Value for across

8
9
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