Dictionary.com
definitions
  • synonyms

agitprop

[aj-it-prop]
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. agitation and propaganda, especially for the cause of communism.
  2. (often initial capital letter) an agency or department, as of a government, that directs and coordinates agitation and propaganda.
  3. Also ag·it·prop·ist. a person who is trained or takes part in such activities.
Show More
adjective
  1. of or relating to agitprop.
Show More

Origin of agitprop

1930–35; < Russian Agitpróp, orig. for Agitatsiónno-propagandístskiĭ otdél Agitation Propaganda Section (of the Central Committee, or a local committee, of the Communist Party); subsequently the head of such a section, or in compound names of political education organs, as agitpropbrigáda, etc.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for agitprop

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Agitprop, in turn, is responsible for the transmission of guidelines down to the lowest levels of party organization.

    Area Handbook for Bulgaria

    Eugene K. Keefe, Violeta D. Baluyut, William Giloane, Anne K. Long, James M. Moore, and Neda A. Walpole


British Dictionary definitions for agitprop

agitprop

noun
  1. (often capital) (formerly) a bureau of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, in charge of agitation and propaganda on behalf of Communism
    1. any promotion, as in the arts, of political propaganda, esp of a Communist nature
    2. (as modifier)agitprop theatre
Show More

Word Origin

C20: short for Russian Agitpropbyuro, from agit (atsiya) agitation + prop (aganda) propaganda
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for agitprop

n.

also agit-prop, 1938, from Russian agitatsiya "agitation" (from French agitation; see agitation) + propaganda, from German (see propaganda).

Show More
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper