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2017 Word of the Year

aguish

[ey-gyoo-ish] /ˈeɪ gyu ɪʃ/
adjective
1.
producing, resembling, or resulting from ague.
2.
easily affected by or subject to fits of ague.
3.
shaking; quivering.
Origin of aguish
1610-1620
First recorded in 1610-20; ague + -ish1
Related forms
aguishly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for aguish
Historical Examples
  • During the night Don Luis was attacked with aguish symptoms.

    California

    J. Tyrwhitt Brooks
  • Morse had lived before in aguish districts, and had no fear.

    Selected Stories Bret Harte
  • The smell of the aguish flats which fringed that part of Paris rose strong in his nostrils.

    Count Hannibal Stanley J. Weyman
  • An aguish climate will make inhabitants sheer off speedily to healthier localities.

    Cedar Creek Elizabeth Hely Walshe
  • By these Methods frequently the aguish Paroxysms became gradually milder, and at last vanished.

  • Miss Jane Wood was sitting with Mrs. North in the aguish belvedere.

    Dorothy and other Italian Stories Constance Fenimore Woolson
  • I long to see the snow again and to feel a genuine cold and escape from this "aguish" chill.

    My Boyhood John Burroughs
  • Moreover, when rebuilt, no one would have rented them, so aguish and unhealthy was the spot.

    An Old English Home S. Baring-Gould
  • Every man nudged his neighbor, and the aguish, blue-eyed boy grinned in a ghastly, self-satisfied way.

    Hoosier Mosaics Maurice Thompson
  • I went to dine at Lady Masham's to-day, and she was taken ill of a sore throat, and aguish.

    The Journal to Stella Jonathan Swift

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Word Value for aguish

10
11
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