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2017 Word of the Year

Antietam

[an-tee-tuh m] /ænˈti təm/
noun
1.
a creek flowing from S Pennsylvania through NW Maryland into the Potomac: Civil War battle fought near here at Sharpsburg, Maryland, in 1862.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2017.
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Examples from the Web for Antietam
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And so matters passed rapidly on until the morning of Antietam.

    Shoulder-Straps Henry Morford
  • Her letter—the first received since Antietam—he has read over time and again.

    A War-Time Wooing

    Charles King
  • Grey and blue, the living armies gazed at each other across the Antietam.

    The Long Roll Mary Johnston
  • The other lifted the field-glass and with it swept the Antietam, and the fields and ridges beyond it.

    The Long Roll Mary Johnston
  • From all the ridges of the Antietam the blue cannon thundered, thundered.

    The Long Roll Mary Johnston
British Dictionary definitions for Antietam

Antietam

/ænˈtiːtəm/
noun
1.
a creek in NW Maryland, flowing into the Potomac: scene of a Civil War battle (1862), in which the Confederate forces of General Robert E. Lee were defeated
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for Antietam

place name, eastern U.S., from an Algonquian word perhaps meaning "swift water;" the name occurrs in Pennsylvania and Ohio, but the best-known is a creek near Sharpsburg in Washington County, Maryland, site of a bloody Civil War battle Sept. 17, 1862.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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